feministpony:

Some good tips and tricks presented in a friendly and gender-neutral way for anyone out there who wants to coexist better with their vagina. Definitely recommend this video!

georgiagracegibson:

I made this transparent version of 'I Don't Only Have Glitter In My Veins' for a project with thepulpzine and katenash. I couldn’t face not putting it on my blog because it looks too cute against the background! 

georgiagracegibson:

I made this transparent version of 'I Don't Only Have Glitter In My Veins' for a project with thepulpzine and katenash. I couldn’t face not putting it on my blog because it looks too cute against the background! 

Anonymous said: How to use cloth/reusable pads?

hi! thanks for writing in.

it may vary depend on what brand you buy, but in terms of wearing them, it’s usually the same as disposable pads. most have wings with snaps or velcro to stay in place.

as for cleaning, again it depends on the product but from what i understand you should rinse them off with cold water after use and then just toss them in the wash with the rest of your laundry. for more information, please check out: http://www.wikihow.com/Wash-a-Reusable-Menstrual-Pad

hope this helps! :)

i do want to say that the vast majority of responses i’ve seen to that post about cissexist/transphobic terms to avoid have been positive, either agreeing or saying something like, “oh wow, i never had thought about that” so i don’t want it to seem like everyone’s being an asshole

but yeah i do see someone reblog it with that kind of commentary every once in a while where someone talks about how it’s “going too far” and it’s just like? literally the post is asking you to consider instead of saying “women” say “people”. that’s pretty much it.

you are saying that changing one or two words that you probably don’t even use very much is where your support and solidarity ends. i just don’t even know what to say to people like that.

destiel—is-canon:

menstrualblog:

smitethepatriarchy:

I like the word “menarche” to describe the first period. It sounds cool.

also a great alternative!

okay i am very supportive of trans and genderfluid people as well as people who don’t identify themselves as any gender but jesus christ not using gendered terms has gone too far! i will personally fight your battles for you as i do very often too, but i will not completely stop using genders for the sake of a handfull of people who are not included universally when i’m talking about trivial things such as this. i will respect every person for what they are and when talking directly to them or about them i will use the terms that they are the most comfortable with, but this is getting out of hand

"i am very supportive of trans people but also i refuse to change the way i speak in even the most minor way to acknowledge that they exist. that’s just going too far"
yeah. okay.

destiel—is-canon:

menstrualblog:

smitethepatriarchy:

I like the word “menarche” to describe the first period. It sounds cool.

also a great alternative!

okay i am very supportive of trans and genderfluid people as well as people who don’t identify themselves as any gender but jesus christ not using gendered terms has gone too far! i will personally fight your battles for you as i do very often too, but i will not completely stop using genders for the sake of a handfull of people who are not included universally when i’m talking about trivial things such as this. i will respect every person for what they are and when talking directly to them or about them i will use the terms that they are the most comfortable with, but this is getting out of hand

"i am very supportive of trans people but also i refuse to change the way i speak in even the most minor way to acknowledge that they exist. that’s just going too far"

yeah. okay.

Anonymous said: i have horrible period cramps, HELP ME

themindislimitless:

You and me both, ‘non. Here’s what’ll help:

  • Water. Drink loads of water. Get loads of water
  • And lie down.
  • The water is important for cramps but it’s also important because soon you will have to pee which means you’ll have to get up. So get up, pee, and stretch (cw transphobia). Some people exercise. They will survive the apocalypse. I will tell you right now, when my insides are bleeding and my muscles all hate me, I will not exercise. Stretches are nice though. Helpful.
  • (food cw) Please remember to eat meals regularly and drink loads of water. It’s important. Not eating well is gonna have your body malfunction anyway. When it’s on top of period pain, that is going to be suuuper painful. Like, honestly. Too much pain to make food? I’m remembering all of yesterday right now and I suggest you please eat.
  • Heat pads! If you have medical ones, good for you. If you don’t, grab all the pillows you can and deposit them over your legs and stomach. Hot water bottles. Grab a warm person. Particularly crushes and/or significant others. Cuddle with them. Apparently since it makes you happy, it relieves cramp pain. IDK grab anyone you like and cuddle. Release the happy chemicals.
  • Speaking of endorphins? Chocolate! DARK chocolate. Chickpeas (hummus??) is helpful. Dill. Sesame seeds. Celery, apparently.
  • Loads and loads of water.
  • Apparently reducing dairy helps reduce pain though. I should probably listen, but I have milk to finish before it expires. Oh, you know what tho? Avoid fried food if you can. Also alcohol and coffee if supposed to make cramps worse. 
  • Orgasms are supposed to be either super nice or super awful. IDK.
  • Lie face down on a pillow, stick your butt up in the air. A++ relief.
  • And DRINK A LOT OF WATER.
amandaneumann:

Clue the period tracker app is seriously my favorite thing right now. People with menstrual cycles should check it out! #periods #menstruation #clue #periodtracker

amandaneumann:

Clue the period tracker app is seriously my favorite thing right now. People with menstrual cycles should check it out! #periods #menstruation #clue #periodtracker

Menstrual Yoga.

tw for cissexist language in the link

Resource: List of Reusable Menstrual Products

warblebee:

There are many reasons people might prefer reusable period products that they can purchase once and not have to worry about replenishing every single month—cost reasons, environmental concerns, health reasons, etc. 

With that in mind, here’s a short list of alternatives to single-use pads and tampons. I can only personally vouch for the DivaCup, but I’ve heard positive things from others about all of these. These are all pricier upfront than single-use pads and tampons, but they quickly pay for themselves if you can afford the investment. Some of these sites also offer package deals on various reusable products.

Underwear for Suitable Menstruation/Light Incontinence

 Reusable Pads

Reusable Internal Products

Feel free to add to this list!

tw for cissexist language in the links

Most helpful pages when deciding on a menstrual cup.

girlyfeminism:

Cup Softness Charts:

http://menstrualcups.wordpress.com/2010/08/19/cup-size-comparison-charts/

If tampons are uncomfortable, go softer. If you’re more active, pick a harder one.

Brand Comparison Photos and Capacity Charts:

http://menstrualcupinfo.wordpress.com/brand-comparison-photos/

This one has more pictures

http://menstrualcup.co/compare-menstrual-cups/

This one is better organized and easier to navigate

Good luck!

feministjewishfangirl said: Hi! I stumbled across your website after a friend mentioned her cloth pads. I think this is really cool, but why do you use gendered language? It's cissexist. I'm actually really disappointed; you seem like such a progressive initiative, and even apart from that it doesn't make good business sense. I guess my question is, why do you exclude people who menstruate and aren't women?

okay, so i think gladrags are a great product and i’ve posted a lot on my blog about how i support alternative menstrual products, so please do not take this as me initiating a boycott against this company or anything like, however

this post really bothers me a whole lot because it’s a classic case of a company pretending to “address customers’ concerns” without actually doing anything.

please do NOT read this response from gladrags as an indication that they are working to make their brand less cissexist.

i have no idea if they actually changed packaging, if they did that’s great, but after checking their website after this post, it’s still clear that they are interested in keeping their marketing directed at women. here are some screenshots taken after seeing this post on my dash:

image

image

(the instances of cissexist language have been outlined in red)

also, this is what their mission statement on their website reads:

gladragspads:

Hi! Good question. It’s a tricky spot we’re in—for the most part, our customers do identify with gender-indicating words ‘woman’ (or words like “feminine,” etc) and so it’s a word and type of language we use a lot, simply because the majority of our customers respond well to it, and we exist to serve our customers.

However, we firmly believe that not all women menstruate, and not all who menstruate are women! We recently made a change to some packaging by removing the words ‘for women’ and adding ‘for menstruation’ in its place for that very reason. (This was actually prompted by a tweet from a customer, so do know that we take your feedback seriously!)

So please know that we make a conscious effort to be inclusive to all menstruators, regardless of how they identify! We’re a small business that’s doing our best to be inclusive, but sometimes we aren’t perfect (despite our best efforts!) ;)

Thanks for getting in touch with us!

XOXO,

Tracy

Our Mission

Our mission is to provide high quality sustainable menstrual products and empower women by positively transforming the experience of menstruation.

( http://gladrags.com/about.html )

again, gladrags is not alone in appearing to market their product to exclusively women and i’m not trying to act like they are uniquely problematic in this respect, but it really makes me upset when companies lie to and manipulate their consumers about being “progressive” when they have no intention of changing their ways

to the OP: you signed this post as “Tracy” so i’m going to assume that you are the owner of the company as listed on the website. you have the power to change your website and your brand and TRULY make it progressive and accepting to people of all genders. it would make me so happy to see that you’ve read this post and realized there are some basic changes you need to make to your brand and then actually implemented those changes. but at this time, i can’t say that you have done that.

please don’t take this as a post that’s “trashing” your company; it’s not. take it as a encouragement to take the next step and actually try to change how people view “womanhood” and fight cissexism.

How to use menstrual products superpost

plannedparenthood:

image

Yepp, it’s Shark Week, so we’re talking about periods! Here’s a refresher on how you should be using your menstrual products:

Most people use pads, tampons, or menstrual cups to collect their period flow and protect their clothes from stains. You can buy pads and tampons in most drugstores or supermarkets. Menstrual cups are most easily bought online. Every package has instructions in it. Pads and tampons come in different sizes. Some are for lighter flows (usually called light or slim), and some are for heavier flows (usually called heavy or super). Using a tampon, cup, or pad takes a little practice. Try different kinds until you figure out what you like best.

TAMPONS

Tampons are little plugs of cotton that fit inside your vagina and absorb menstrual blood. Tampons can’t get lost inside your vagina or move to another part of your body. They stay inside until you remove them. Most people can’t feel tampons if they’re placed in the vagina correctly.

How to use tampons:

  • Wash your hands and get into the position that’s most comfortable for you. Many people squat, put one leg up, or sit on the toilet with their knees apart.
  • Slide the tampon into your vagina using the applicator or your finger, depending on what kind of tampon you have.
  • Putting a tampon in your vagina shouldn’t be painful, but it may hurt if you’re not relaxed. Using tampons with smooth, rounded applicators may make it easier.
  • If you’re still not comfortable, ask someone you trust to show you how to correctly place it in your vagina.
  • Tampons have a string at one end that hangs out of your vagina. Slowly pulling the string removes the tampon. It’s easier to remove a tampon when it’s fully soaked.
  • Change your tampon every 3-4 hours to prevent odor and stains on your clothes.
  • You can wear tampons overnight, but not for more than 8 hours. Change it as soon as you get up in the morning.
  • Don’t use super or heavy tampons unless you really need them, and change them often.
  • When you take the tampon out, wrap it in toilet paper and throw it away in the trash.
  • You can wear tampons in the water, and during all kinds of sports and activities.
  • Using a tampon takes practice. Try different kinds until you figure out what you like best, but don’t wear tampons unless you’re actually having your period.
  • Don’t douche or use scented tampons or vaginal deodorants — this can lead to irritation or infection. If you’re worried about odor, change your tampon more often.

PADS

Unlike tampons or cups, pads are worn outside of your body. Pads stay in place with a strip of adhesive that sticks to the inside of your underwear. Some have “wings” or flaps that fold over the sides of your underwear to protect against leaks and stains. Like tampons, pads have different sizes. Pads can be very thin (for light flows) or cushy (for heavier flows).

How to use pads:

  • Peel the backing off the adhesive strip and press the pad into your underwear.
  • Change your pad every three to four hours, or when it’s soaked, to prevent odors and stains on your clothes.
  • You can wear pads overnight.
  • Don’t flush used pads down the toilet. They’ll clog it up. Wrap them in toilet paper and put them in the trash.
  • Pads can be used with tampons or cups as a backup in case of leaks.
  • You can’t wear a pad in the water. If you want to go swimming or do very active sports, use a tampon or cup instead of a pad.
  • Don’t douche or use scented pads or vaginal deodorants — this can lead to irritation or infection. If you’re worried about odor, change your pad more often.

MENSTRUAL CUPS

Menstrual cups are shaped like little bells or bowls, and they’re made of rubber, silicone, or soft plastic. They’re held inside your body by the walls of your vagina, where they collect menstrual fluid.

Most menstrual cups are reusable, which means that you use the same cup over and over again. Some people like this because it’s better for the environment and costs less than using disposable products like tampons or pads.

Cups may look kind of big, but most people can’t feel them once they’re placed into the vagina. Cups can’t fall out, get stuck inside your vagina, or move to another part of your body. They stay inside until you remove them.

How to use menstrual cups:

  • There are different types of cups, but each one comes with directions that explain the best way to use it.
  • Wash your hands and get into the position that’s most comfortable for you. Many people squat, put one leg up, or sit on the toilet with their knees apart.
  • To insert a cup, you usually fold or squeeze it so it’s easier to put in your vagina. Follow the directions that came with your cup to find the best way to put it in.
  • Putting a menstrual cup in your vagina shouldn’t be painful, but it may be uncomfortable if you’re not relaxed.
  • If you’re having problems inserting your cup or it feels uncomfortable once it’s in, ask someone you trust to help you read the directions and insert your cup correctly.
  • Menstrual cups can be worn overnight or for up to 12 hours, but you can empty it as often as you want. The cup will leak if it gets too full.
  • To remove and empty a menstrual cup, put your fingers in your vagina, then gently squeeze the cup and pull it out. Empty the menstrual fluid in a toilet, sink, or shower drain. Wash it with warm water and mild, unscented soap (or just wipe off the outside with toilet paper), and then put it back in. Always follow the cleaning directions that came with your cup.
  • Menstrual cups cannot be flushed down the toilet. If you have to throw away a menstrual cup, put it in the trash.
  • Menstrual cups usually take a little more practice to get used to than tampons or pads. It may take a couple of periods to get it right. You can wear a pad as a backup in case your cup leaks. You can’t wear a tampon and a cup at the same time.
  • Cups can be worn in the water and during all kinds of sports and activities.
  • Don’t douche or use vaginal deodorants with your cup — this can lead to irritation or infection. If you’re worried about odor, empty your cup more often.

Anonymous said: It's been a year since I got my first period and they still aren't regular. Is that normal or should I talk to a doctor?

that’s totally normal. :)

Anonymous said: Being on my period makes me so much more depressed that I struggle to get up... I don't know what to do...

mental-health-advice:

Heylo,

If you have a OBGYN (or a general practitioner) you can go to them and explain that you get more depressed around your period and see what they can do for you.

My doctor and therapist once told me that sometimes people can get a form of PMS (I know, ugh, hang in there with me) where they are much more irritable and depressed than the ‘usual’. I know about this because I used to have it. (I say ‘used to’ because I have antidepressants that keep it at bay.)

It’s known as PMDD or premenstrual dysphoric disorder. If you think this is something that could be happening to you, you should tell someone such as your mother or father, and have them take you to a doctor. You can ask about antidepressants. If you have depression, or think you do, antidepressants can help make it all more bearable, and you can get started on the road to treatment.

It may seem silly or embarassing to go to the doctor for something involving your period (due to the stigma that periods are ‘no big deal’. Punch anyone who says this. ((kidding. sort of.))) but it sounds like it is affecting your daily life, and that is no good!

I hope I helped. Let me know if you want more information or need more advice!

Periods are the dickens.

Stay chill,

Noah

alyarney:

Finally finished! Details on how to order a print will be coming soon!  #nature #taming #menstruation #puberty #adolescence #gold #nude #youngbuck #deer #spotting #blossoming #fertility

alyarney:

Finally finished! Details on how to order a print will be coming soon!  #nature #taming #menstruation #puberty #adolescence #gold #nude #youngbuck #deer #spotting #blossoming #fertility